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A Walk through Tin Shui Wai, New Territories, Hong Kong

Whilst visiting my N2D (Number 2 Daughter) in Hong Kong as she recovered from hip surgery I finally worked up the courage to take a long walk and explore Tin Shui Wai, New Territories, Hong Kong.This area had been the home of N2D for the past 18 months. I’ve been meaning to put a post together to show everyone what Tin Shui Wai was like, but found time a little constrained lately. However, I have finally managed to put something together and for those who are interested, I hope you enjoy.

During my stay, I’d regularly visit the gym and learnt to use the treadmill, however, I was craving a good old fashioned long walk. The only problem was, and why I hadn’t gone sooner, was Tin Shui Wai is a concrete jungle, with high rise buildings that appear to all look the same. Until you’ve been there awhile and begin to slowly notice the differences, to the unobservant eye, everything blends in and looks the same. Everything, including street signs are written in Chinese and I did not know any landmarks to help me out.

One thing I had noticed though was the grey skies of Tin Shui Wai. In the 12 days I visited we got a total of 20 minutes of sunshine; no joke! Sunshine seemed scarce in this part of the world. Yes, it was winter, but gosh, you’d think it would be sunny for some of it. I’m not sure how I’d go living there for any length of time. I’m sure I’d miss my Brissy climate. Us BrisVegas folk are really quite spoilt when it comes to weather.

After Day 6, I decided that I just had to take a walk, no matter what. What the heck! It would be an adventure and a chance to feel vulnerable just like I know I will when walking through Spain. I procured a local map from reception of the hotel and began to study it. I would walk alone and hoped not to get lost. N2D gave me the hotel’s phone number to call if I did. I hoped I would not have to use it. Today’s post will be pictorial. I hope you enjoy.

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The start of my walk began at a park close to where N2D lives.

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I found some children blowing bubbles near the water fountain.

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A typical view throughout the parkland

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The gardens are well kept and clean

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The backdrop behind the park

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Identical bridges just like this one are built all along the canal at set distances

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Locals stroll and ride their bikes along the banks of the canal

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The walkway beside the canal

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These bridges help locals cross from one side of the canal to the other and are all identical

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 The grungier side of the canal

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Contrast: Wall art vs neglect & litter

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A sacrifice of thanksgiving

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High rise apartment buildings like this one are found everywhere. People string their washing outside the windows.

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Until the 1990’s Tin Shui Wai did not exist – it was totally a vast wetland and rice paddies

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Many locals make use of this area – I even saw a man getting his hair clipped while sitting on a kitchen chair along this walkway

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Little boxes full of people

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Hong Kong Wetlands Park is a feature of this area

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I ended up making a full circuit back to where I started by following my local map

(instead of retracing my steps as I originally planned – it seems I became more adventurous)

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The electric trams are used to get the locals to the nearest train station – they are a fast and efficient mode of transport

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I had to smile at this…

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Here marks the spot where I begin to head away from my circuit and begin to navigate my way back to my starting position – into the jungle I go

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The autumn leaves of winter

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The colours of Tin Shui Wai

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It’s a rabbit warren in there – there are tunnels and ramps everywhere – you really need to know where you are going

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I had to chuckle

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More traditional styles of signage

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I wonder if this school has a playground?

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It really is a jungle in there – a concrete jungle with a dash of green

In total I walked for nearly three hours exploring Tin Shui Wai. I enjoyed the walk immensely and I found the sights and people intriguing. I didn’t get lost, although a lovely elderly Chinese couple did stop and confirm that I was headed in the right direction after I paused at one of the intersections (for a wee bit longer than normal). I was trying to get my bearings and they could see me studying my map (maybe the way I kept turning the map around gave them a clue). They kindly came to my ‘rescue’ and set me on my way once again.

Buen Camino

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4 Comments Post a comment
  1. Thank you for the amazing photo. The city looked like a interesting place.

    March 9, 2015
  2. Kimmy #

    Awesome mum! I can’t wait to one day see pictures and hear all about your adventures to Spain!!!

    August 12, 2013
    • Thank you for reading and enjoying the pics Kimmy. One day there’ll be some pics of Spain, for sure! 🙂

      September 13, 2013
  3. Ian Smith #

    Bewdiful Deb – proud of your adventurous spirit and sense of humour.
    You HAD to turn that map around didn’t you!

    Love Ian

    August 8, 2013

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